Farnell Mascot Soldier Bears Pocket

Sometimes it takes the smallest of things to help children begin to understand a complex situation. In this instance, it was a small teddy bear. During World War One, Farnell (known as the ‘English Steiff’ by collectors) produced tiny 3.5in high bears which they called ‘Mascot Bears’. They were given as gifts and taken to the Front by soldiers, as mementos of home and loved ones as they endured the trenches and the terrors of war. A staggering quarter of a million soldiers were under 19 years old, the average age of a soldier was 24, and the average life expectancy in the trenches was only six weeks. I was first captivated by these tiny teddies after helping to sell the amazing Campbell Collection in 1999, when I worked at Sotheby’s, but it took me another 14 years to actually buy one for myself (above right). In 2014, the centenary of the start of World War One, I wrote an article about Mascot Bears for Homes & Antiques magazine, that appeared in their July issue. They’ve very kindly …

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Sam Herman Glass

Sam Herman (b.1936) is undoubtedly one of the most important and influential living glass artists and makers in the world today. After studying and helping to develop the new studio glass techniques directly under their inventors, Harvey Littleton and Dominick Labino, at the University of Wisconsin, he brought them to the UK in 1965. He worked briefly with Michael Harris at the Royal College of Art, before becoming a Research Fellow there in the same year and then, a few years later, Lecturer in Glass. He went on to co-found The Glasshouse in London in 1969, helping and inspiring hundreds of glass artists, providing them with the tools, support and space to create, and the venue to sell from. In 1974, he was invited by the South Australian Government to bring his unique style, skills and studio glass techniques to Adelaide, where he founded a glass studio at the Jam Factory. On his return to England in 1979, he founded his own studio in Lots Road, Chelsea, and became an Honorary Fellow of the …

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Ten years ago today, the first retrospective exhibition of West German ceramics of the 1960s & 70s, featuring the Graham Cooley Collection, closed at the King’s Lynn Arts Centre. Over 500 ceramics were included, and over 3,500 people came to visit. It was accompanied by a catalogue of the same title, written by me, of which three editions, totalling several thousand copies, have now sold out. Together they launched ‘Fat Lava’ into the world. As well as bringing these ceramics together for the first time, the exhibition and book also revealed factory and designer names, ranges – and the sheer variety available out there. Since then, the term has gone on to become commonplace in the retro, vintage, collectables and antiques world. No vintage or 20thC design shop in the Western world worth its salt hasn’t handled at least a few, or has some in stock, and there are dozens of specialist dealers – and many thousands of collectors. Fat Lava has been featured in prestigious interior design magazines from Elle Decor to World of Interiors, and pieces …

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