This October saw my 20th anniversary working professionally in the antiques business. In October 1996, I was offered a full time role as a porter in Bonhams‘ Collectors Department, then based in Lots Road, Chelsea. Several months of being a general porter setting up and manning views for £50 per week were over, and I was delighted to accept a job for £7,500 a year. My first boss was Alexander Crum Ewing (above, on the rostrum, and still a dear friend), and my colleagues were Leigh Gotch (head of the toy department), his assistant James Bridges, Ted Owen (head of the entertainment department), his assistant Nicky Tonkinson, Elizabeth Carr-Wilson, and Sara Sturgess, who ran the pen department.

It was the closest thing to an apprenticeship that I could have found or desired and I was in my element, dealing with everything from vintage writing equipment, scientific instruments, and mechanical music, to a whole range of toys, dolls and teddies and entertainment memorabilia, including working on the now legendary Beatles and Elvis sales. It laid …

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Henryk Albin Tomaszewski Glass

Attributions in the world of antiques and collecting change frequently, and across the board too, from porcelain to furniture to glass. This is particularly the case with ‘new markets’, like mid-century modern Italian ceramics and postwar Czech glass design.  A new source will be unearthed, such as a catalogue or forgotten book, or a piece will be discovered with a correct, original label. On rare occasions, the designer or maker themselves surfaces to set the story straight. The sculptural design shown here, in olive green and yellow, is usually attributed to the talented Czech designer Pavel Hlava. This is mainly due to the fact that he produced some blown glass during the 1970s & 80s with internal structures vaguely similar to these. It’s also because, along with Frantisek Vizner, he’s a well-known ‘big name’ and many are keen to raise the profile – and value – of their piece by attributing it to him. I never believed this attribution, as the glass is thicker than most of Hlava’s work, the machined base is different, the actual technique isn’t …

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