There had to be one…

Last week I found myself lecturing in Worthing, where I was confronted with my fantasy antiques shop. Alas, as the sharp eyed will notice, it was closed for the day. So no chance for me of tasting some of Mrs Overall’s delicious homemade macaroons with a nice cup of tea, or even a wee dram of her sherry. Boo. Maybe Cousin Jerez won after all…

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They’re here….

…but with no fuzzy TV screens in sight. I am, of course, referring to Kevin Graham’s long-awaited magnum opus (or 0pi) on postwar West German Ceramics. With nearly a decade of research behind him, my good friend Kevin will finally be publishing two books on 1st July. The first is ‘From Spritzdekor to Fat Lava’, which comprises of 262 A4 pages containing 568 colour photographs and 282 photographed makers’ marks. A staggering 108 companies are featured, along with designers, decor names, and dates. This volume alone is a real ‘must’ for any serious collector or dealer. The second is a companion volume, ‘West & East German Makers – Marks & Form Numbers’. Ever wondered what those weird numbers and marks on the bottom of your vase mean? Well, they’re the main key to identification (supported by the form and glaze), and this is the book that will help you unlock the door. The book’s 174 pages list the shape numbers of over 200 companies – comprising literally thousands and …

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Names we like…

Every now and again in Miller’s Towers, we come across names that make us smile in the course of researching our books. Here’re some we’ve found recently:

May Doorbar, Charlotte Rhead’s housekeeper. Gwendoline Suckling, decorator at Poole Pottery from 1935-39. Thelma Bush, decorator at Poole Pottery, from 1966-68. Fuller Pilch, cricket batsman, known for his ‘Pilch’s Poke’ forward-batting play. Orval Overall, Chicago cubs pitcher, 1905-10.

My favourite has to be May Doorbar – that name paints a certain picture in my mind as a housekeeper! If you have any others, please do share.

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Well, at least the rain held off! It was that that everyone seemed most worried about as the merry band of Antiques Roadshow production crew and specialists gathered in the beautifully manicured grounds of Saumarez Manor on the idyllic island of Guernsey. The photo above shows the event just before the gates opened. What you can’t see is the queue, which was there in force, with everyone clutching their carefully wrapped treasures. All eyes gazed upwards at the stormy clouds, but someone up there smiled down on the BBC, and by the time the afternoon, and the queue, had been and gone, the sun was shining. As with all Roadshows, thousands of people had brought thousands of objects to be appraised, commented on, identified and valued by the specialists, and many went home with an extra broad grin on their faces. I managed to film something (above) from amidst everything I saw, and you’ll just have to wait and watch the …

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